Language, music and a sense of community are some of the most universal things known to mankind, common across every culture and age, since the beginning of time. Bring them all together and you get the world of theatre. Can we think back on how many times we’ve started a speech with “Friends, Romans, countrymen”, or wanted to the change the ending of Romeo and Juliet or wished we could meet a chocolate cream soldier? The love of theatre, the drama, the characters is, I think at least a little bit there, in each of us. Even if all we know about theatre is how to spell William Shakespeare.

And that’s why, when I received an intriguing company email about a theatre workshop on May 2nd, I jumped at the chance to go learn more about theatre. A few of us inquisitive folks got together that day at one of our offices and we were introduced to Silky from the Ashima Theatre Group, and also Mayank, a colleague and a passionate theatre enthusiast, who also co-owned Ashima .And here started the journey of a bunch of strangers to bring to life a Theatre Club for the world to behold.

Playing the memory games

Playing the memory games

Unlike me, some of the folks there had worked seriously in dramas at least in their colleges, and some were still very actively involved in the life of theatre. But, as we all were to slowly learn, being an actor on stage takes a lot more than a strong voice or the lack of stage fright. One of the most important and obvious tool we need, is that of memory.The workshop had an interesting approach for us to learn and remember these various tools. To teach us the necessity of memory we played a couple of games, where we had to remember the name of everyone who had come to the workshop. It wasn’t easy; as I remember that we had 3 Amits that day and had quite a crazy time remembering who was who. But, it surely drove home the point that memorizing lines is no easy task. And that theatre requires, along with undying passion, a whole lot of hard work as well.

Talking about the nava rasas

Talking about the nava rasas

Then we learned that all of theatre, all of acting has in essence 9 basic emotions or ‘rasas’ and every other mood or emotion can be built on these or a combination of these. We were then promptly organised into groups and asked to come up with a plot and perform based on the rasa that we’d been assigned.It was an exhilarating experience, with most of us ad libbing our way through a skeleton plot. We sat in awe, as we saw group after group come and perform, sometimes wondering if we could have done a scene better, but mostly excited about taking our baby steps in Drishya. Of course, we were all lacking polish to some degree or another, but most of us knew that this was just the beginning and we’d be coming back for more.

The groups hatching their plots

The groups hatching their plots

PS:Please note that all pictures were taken by members of our club and can be used only in matters related to the club.

Advertisements